Dilip Kumar Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 9
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How to contact Dilip Kumar ? Dilip Kumar Contact Address, Email ID, Website, Phone Number

Dilip Kumar Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website

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Dilip Kumar Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 10

Dilip Kumar, born Muhammad Yusuf Khan on December 11, 1922 in Peshawar, British India [now Pakistan], is one of Bollywood’s renowned performers. He excelled in a wide variety of roles due to his low-key, genuine acting style. Along with his acting abilities, he was admired for his good looks, deep voice, and impeccable accent.

Kumar was born into a 12-child Pashtun family. He relocated to Bombay (now Mumbai) and began working at a British army cafeteria, where he was seen by Devika Rani, a prominent actress at the time, and her husband, Himanshu Rai, who engaged him to appear for their film company, the Bombay Talkies. Kumar made his acting debut in 1944 with Jwar bhata, but it was not until a few years later with Jugnu that he had a box-office hit (1947). He shot to fame in 1949 as a co-star with Raj Kapoor in Mehboob Khan’s film Andaz (“A Matter of Style”).


As his career evolved, Kumar played a series of tragic characters in films such as Deedar (1951; “Meeting”), Daag (1952)—for which he won the first of eight Filmfare Awards for best actor—and Devdas (1953). (1955). His movie character took on melancholic overtones, and he earned the moniker “lord of tragedy.” He eventually embraced a more optimistic image, portraying swashbuckling heroes in films such as Aan (1953; “Pride”), Azaad (1955; “Free”), Insaniyat (1955; “Humane”), and Kohinoor (1955; “Humane”) (1960). He starred as Crown Prince Salim, son of the renowned Mughal emperor Akbar, in the 1960 hit Mughal-e-Azam. Among Kumar’s other notable films are Bimal Roy’s Madhumati (1958), Nitin Bose’s Gunga Jumna (1961), and Tapan Sinha’s Sagina (1963). (1974).

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Dilip Kumar Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 11

Dilip Kumar, born Muhammad Yusuf Khan on December 11, 1922 in Peshawar, British India [now Pakistan], is one of Bollywood’s renowned performers. He excelled in a wide variety of roles due to his low-key, genuine acting style. Along with his acting abilities, he was admired for his good looks, deep voice, and impeccable accent.

Kumar was born into a 12-child Pashtun family. He relocated to Bombay (now Mumbai) and began working at a British army cafeteria, where he was seen by Devika Rani, a prominent actress at the time, and her husband, Himanshu Rai, who engaged him to appear for their film company, the Bombay Talkies. Kumar made his acting debut in 1944 with Jwar bhata, but it was not until a few years later with Jugnu that he had a box-office hit (1947). He shot to fame in 1949 as a co-star with Raj Kapoor in Mehboob Khan’s film Andaz (“A Matter of Style”).

As his career evolved, Kumar played a series of tragic characters in films such as Deedar (1951; “Meeting”), Daag (1952)—for which he won the first of eight Filmfare Awards for best actor—and Devdas (1953). (1955). His movie character took on melancholic overtones, and he earned the moniker “lord of tragedy.” He eventually embraced a more optimistic image, portraying swashbuckling heroes in films such as Aan (1953; “Pride”), Azaad (1955; “Free”), Insaniyat (1955; “Humane”), and Kohinoor (1955; “Humane”) (1960). He starred as Crown Prince Salim, son of the renowned Mughal emperor Akbar, in the 1960 hit Mughal-e-Azam. Among Kumar’s other notable films are Bimal Roy’s Madhumati (1958), Nitin Bose’s Gunga Jumna (1961), and Tapan Sinha’s Sagina (1963). (1974).


Kumar earned a Filmfare Lifetime Achievement Award in 1994. The next year, he received India’s top honour for cinematic brilliance, the Dadasaheb Phalke Prize. He was the second Indian (after Morarji Desai) to receive the Nishan-e-Imtiaz, Pakistan’s highest civilian award, in 1998. He stated his desire to retire from acting that same year. From 2000 until 2006, he was a member of the Rajya Sabha, India’s bicameral parliament’s upper chamber.

Dilip Kumar Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 12

Bollywood, Hindi-language film business in India that originated in Bombay (now Mumbai) in the 1930s and has grown into a vast film empire.

Bollywood, Hindi-language film business in India that originated in Bombay (now Mumbai) in the 1930s and has grown into a vast film empire.

Often, rather than plots, the films were driven by their stars. The Indian audience developed an insatiable desire for news about its movie stars beginning in 1936, when Ashok Kumar and Devika Rani became the first prominent star couple. Male stars such as Raj Kapoor, Dilip Kumar, and Dev Anand in the 1950s and 1960s, Rajesh Khanna in the 1970s, Amitabh Bachchan in the 1980s, and Shah Rukh Khan in the 1990s maintained this passion. In the 1950s, Madhubala was a popular female icon; in the 1960s, Mumtaz was a popular female icon; in the 1970s, Zeenat Aman was a popular female symbol; in the 1980s, Hema Malini was a popular female icon; and in the 1990s, Madhuri Dixit and Kajol were popular female icons.

Often, rather than plots, the films were driven by their stars. The Indian audience developed an insatiable desire for news about its movie stars beginning in 1936, when Ashok Kumar and Devika Rani became the first prominent star couple. Male stars such as Raj Kapoor, Dilip Kumar, and Dev Anand in the 1950s and 1960s, Rajesh Khanna in the 1970s, Amitabh Bachchan in the 1980s, and Shah Rukh Khan in the 1990s maintained this passion. In the 1950s, Madhubala was a popular female icon; in the 1960s, Mumtaz was a popular female icon; in the 1970s, Zeenat Aman was a popular female symbol; in the 1980s, Hema Malini was a popular female icon; and in the 1990s, Madhuri Dixit and Kajol were popular female icons.

At the turn of the twenty-first century, India’s film industry — of which Bollywood remained the largest component — was producing up to 1,000 feature films per year in all of the country’s major languages and in a variety of cities, and international audiences among South Asians in the United Kingdom and the United States began to develop. The repetitive storylines, superbly planned battle scenes, stunning song-and-dance routines, emotion-charged melodrama, and larger-than-life heroes remained standard aspects of Bollywood films.


Film, alternatively referred to as motion picture or film, is a series of still photos on film that are projected in fast succession onto a screen using light. This creates the illusion of true, smooth, and continuous movement due to the optical phenomena known as persistence of perception.

Dilip Kumar Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 13

Film is an incredibly efficient medium for expressing drama and, more importantly, for evoking emotion. Motion picture art is incredibly complicated, needing contributions from practically every other art form as well as a plethora of technical abilities (for example, in sound recording, photography, and optics). This new art form emerged at the end of the nineteenth century and quickly became one of the most popular and important media of the twentieth century and beyond.

As a business venture, film swiftly established itself as possibly the first really mass form of entertainment, presenting fictional narratives to vast audiences in theatres. Without sacrificing its broad appeal, the medium evolved into a vehicle for artistic expression in fields including as acting, directing, scripting, cinematography, costume and set design, and music

Throughout its brief existence, the art of motion pictures has frequently suffered seemingly fundamental transformations, such as those brought about by the advent of sound. It exists now in a variety of styles and formats, ranging from the documentary recorded by a single person using a handheld camera to the multimillion-dollar epic employing hundreds of performers and technicians.

Numerous aspects come to mind when considering the cinematic experience. For one thing, the illusion of movement is moderately hypnotic, retaining the viewer’s attention and maybe lowering critical resistance. The film image’s accuracy is impressive because it was created via an inhuman, scientific procedure. Additionally, the motion picture conveys a strong sensation of being present; the cinema image is always in the present tense. Additionally, there is the tangible character of film; it looks to depict real people and objects.

Not less significant than any of the preceding are the perfect viewing conditions for a motion picture, in which everything contributes to the film’s dominance of the spectators. They are removed from their normal surroundings, partially isolated from one another, and sitting comfortably in a dark theatre. The darkness directs their focus and precludes them from comparing the image on the screen to nearby items or persons. For a time, spectators inhabit the world depicted in the motion film.

However, the journey into the film’s world is not complete. Occasionally, the audience reacts as though the events on the screen are real—for example, by ducking in front of an onrushing railway in a particular three-dimensional effect. Additionally, such effects are regarded as a pretty poor type of motion picture art. Much more frequently than not, viewers anticipate a film to adhere to certain unwritten rules rather than to reality.

The perception of reality The majority of films seek to achieve goals by the application of a set of norms, or rules, that audiences implicitly accept and confirm through habitual filmgoing. For example, the employment of brownish lighting, filters, and props has come to symbolise the past in films about early twentieth-century American life (as in The Godfather [1972] and Days of Heaven [1978]). The brownish tint associated with these films is a visual code designed to evoke memories of a bygone period when photographs were reproduced in sepia, or brown, tones. The manipulation of actual reality by storytelling codes is much more egregious in its distortion of reality to generate an effect of reality. Audiences are willing to skip large swaths of time in order to reach a story’s major moments. For instance, La battaglia di Algeri (1966; The Battle of Algiers) begins in a torture room, where a captured Algerian rebel has just divulged the whereabouts of his cohorts. That area is attacked in a matter of seconds, and the search-and-destroy mission’s drive compels the audience to believe in the operation’s incredible speed and precision. Additionally, the audience quickly accepts shots from unattainable points of view provided the shot is supported by other elements of the film. For instance, in The Battle of Algiers, the rebels are seen inside a walled-in hiding area, yet this implausible perspective appears convincing due to the film’s grainy photography, which plays on the spectator’s subliminal association with grainy black-and-white newsreels.

The fidelity with which details are reproduced is far less significant than the story’s appeal to an emotional response, an appeal that is based on the inherent features of the motion picture medium. These key features might be classified as those that apply largely to the motion-picture image, those that pertain to motion pictures as a unique medium for works of art, and those that stem from the viewing experience.

In film, the picture, or single shot, is the main unit of expression. The practise of ascribing magical characteristics to images dates all the way back to ancient times. This link is well recorded among numerous primitive peoples, and it is reflected in the name magic lantern, which is used interchangeably with the film projector. Any image extracted from the everyday world and displayed onto a screen looks to be miraculously transmuted to some extent. This mystical nature explains the ecstatic response granted early films such as La Sortie des usines Lumière (1895; “Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory”), which were just photographic records of everyday occurrences in France in the 1890s by the Lumière brothers.

The attributes of intensity, closeness, and ubiquity have been identified as the motion-picture image’s distinguishing characteristics. Its intensity stems from its ability to focus the spectator’s whole attention on whatever fragment of reality is being portrayed. Outside of the theatre, a person’s attention is often scattered throughout the limitless surrounding world, with the exception of periodic times of concentration on anything chosen for closer examination. In the movie, one is pushed to stare at something that was not chosen by the audience but by the filmmaker, for reasons that are not always obvious. This intensity is particularly obvious when the camera is fixed on something for an extended period of time beyond what is reasonable, and spectators gradually become painfully aware of their lack of control over their own attention. Although this approach is not frequently employed, it is extremely effective when applied properly.

The camera’s seeming mobility to roam from location to location or to approach or recede instantly contributes to the camera’s appearance of ubiquity—being everywhere at once. Not to be overlooked in creating this sense of ubiquity is the editing effect, which enables the presentation of innumerable pictures reflecting a lengthy, complicated event in a relatively brief film or sequence, as shown by the opening of The Battle of Algiers. The image’s spatial and temporal authority also lends credence to sequences portraying the past, future, and dreams.

(1)Full Name: Dilip Kumar

(2)Nickname: Dilip Kumar

(3)Born: December 11, 1922

(4)Father: Not Available

(5)Mother: Not Available

(6)Sister: Not Available

(7)Brother: Not Available

(8)Marital Status: Married

(9)Profession: Actor

(10)Birth Sign: Not Available

(11)Nationality: American

(12)Religion: Not Available

(13)Height: Not Available

(14)School: Not Available

(15)Highest Qualifications: Not Available

(16)Hobbies: Not Available

(17)Address: Peshawar British India

(18)Contact Number: Not Available

(19)Email ID: Not Available

(20)Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/public/Dilip-Kumar

(21)Twitter:  https://twitter.com/TheDilipKumar


(22)Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/dilipkumar/?hl=en

(23)Youtube Channel:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIc4hLSF4P8

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