Debbie Stabeno Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 11
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How to contact Debbie Stabeno ? Debbie Stabeno Contact Address, Email ID, Website, Phone Number

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Debbie Stabenow, née Deborah Ann Greer (born 29 April 1950, Gladwin, Michigan, U.S.), a US politicians who were elected to the U.S. Senate as a Democratic in the year 2000, and who began to represent Michigan in the following year. Stabenow was once a member of the House of Representatives of the United States (1997–2001).

Greer attended the University of Michigan, where she graduated with a baccalaureate in 1972 and subsequently a master’s (1975) degree in social work. While working as a social worker, she was a member of the Board of Commissioners of Ingham County (1975–78). He then joined the House of Representatives (1979–90) in Michigan and subsequently the State Senate (1991–94). She married Dennis Stabenow about this time and the pair had two children before they were divorced in 1990. She was later married to Thomas Athans (2003–10).


Stabenow ran for governor in 1994, but was primarily beaten by Howard Wolpe. He then chose her as his rank-and-file lieutenant governor, but lost them in the main election. In 1996, she won a seat in the U.S. House and the next year began office. In 2000, she ran to the US Senate, defeating Republican incumbent Spencer Abraham in a tight fashion. In 2001, she joined the Senate.

As in the House of Representatives, the method and organisation are dominated by political parties and by the committee system. Each party elects a leader, who is generally an important senator with his own power to coordinate the activity of the Senate. The largest party leader is known as the leader of the majority, while the head of the opposition is known as the leader of the minority. The leaders of the Senate also play an essential role in the appointment of Senate committee members to review legislation and process legislation and wield general control over government agencies and departments. The Vice-President of the United States acts as the Senate President but may only vote if a tie exists. In the absence of the Vice President, the president pro tempore, usually the longest-serving member of the majority party, is the chairman of the Senate.

Stabenow was known as a moderate to liberal Democrat. She voted primarily with her party and supported measures such as the prohibition of weapons of attack and high-speed magazines. As a senator on the Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee and its chairman, she played a key role in adopting numerous omnibus agriculture laws (2002, 2008 and 2014) which included reforming agricultural subsidies and the development of public-school nutrient programmes. She has been champion of the Law on Patient Protection and Affordable Care (2010), implementing or co-sponsoring changes to broaden the coverage for maternity care, reducing taxes for small firms providing their workers with health insurance, and lowering recruitment costs. Stabenow has sponsored or cosponsored law to prevent additional environmental deterioration in the Great Lakes and to restrict oil and gas forestry in the region.

One of the two houses of the bicameral U.S. Congress created by the Constitution of the United States in 1789, House of Representatives.

The House of Representatives shares equal legislative duty with the U.S. Senate. As intended by the constitutional framework, the House was to represent the popular will and the people elected its members directly. By contrast, before the enactment of the Seventeenth Amendment (1913), mandating the direct elections of senators, members of the Senate were appointed by the States.

Debbie Stabeno Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 14

At least one Member of the House of Representatives is guaranteed to each State. The seat allocation depends on the population of the Member States and the membership is re-allocated every 10 years after the decennial census. House members are elected from districts with a nearly equal population for a two-year term. Constitutional eligible membership requirements are a minimum of 25 years of age, U.S. citizenship for at least seven years and a residence in the state where the Member is elected, although he/she is not required to reside in the electoral district that he/she represents.

Initially, 59 members were in the House of Representatives. North Carolina and Rhode Island ratified the constitution in 1790 and the first congress (1789–91) adjourned with 65 representatives. By 1912 membership was 435. After the entrance of the states of Alaska and Hawaii in 1959, two additional representatives were added briefly, but on the next legislative distribution membership restored to 435, a number authorised by statute adopted in 1941.

The constitution confers to the House of Representatives some exclusive rights, including the right to commence the process of impeachment and to generate revenue bills. The organisation and character of the House of Representatives has evolved under the influence of political parties, which give a way to manage procedures and mobilise the majorities that are necessary. In the activities of the institution, party leaders such as the Speaker in the House and the leaders of the majority and minorities play a vital role. However, party discipline (i.e., the inclination of all party members to vote the same way) was not always strong, because when the two diverge, Members, who have to face re-election every two years, often vote for the interests of their districts rather than their political parties.

The committee system which divides membership into specialised groups for the purpose of holding hearings, drafting bills for the entire House’s consideration and controlling the House procedure, is another dominant aspect of the House organisation.  Most of the bills are referred to a committee before the whole House can usually act on a bill until it is “reported” by the committee for floor action. There are about twenty (permanent) standing committees, usually grouped around important policy topics, each with staff, budgets and subcommissions. They may organise public interest hearings, suggest legislation which was not formally introduced as a bill or resolution, and conduct investigations. The standing committees include those on appropriations, on ways and means (who handle financial issues) and on rules. Select and specialist committees are also established, usually for a particular project and for a limited term.

Cabinet officials and other officials are often invited to explain policy before the committees. The Constitution (Article I, section 6) forbids members of Congress from holding jobs in the executive branch of government – a main difference between forms of government parliamentary and congressional.


Following the 1920 census, the northeastern and midwestern countries held 270 House seats. Then there was a progressive shift in balance between the two regions, with the 2010 census representing only 172 seats in the northeast and midwest, compared to 263 in the south and in the west. Most notably, the number of New Yorkers fell from 45 in the 1930s to just 27 in 2012, while California grew from 11 to 53.

Speaker of the House is the most important post in the House of Representatives. This person, selected by the majority party, chairs the debate in the second round, appoints selected members and conference committees and performs other crucial tasks (following the vice president).

Debbie Stabeno Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 15

United States Senate, one of the two houses of the United States Parliament (Congress), created under the Constitution in 1789. Each state elects two six-year senators. About one-third of the membership of the Senate expires every two years and is named “the house that never dies.”

The Founding Fathers designed the role of the Senate as a check on the popularly elected House of Representatives. Thus, each state is equally represented irrespective of size or population. Furthermore, the election to the Senate by the state legislatures was indirect until the 17th amendment to the Constitution (1913). They are currently directly elected by the voters of every state.

The Senate shares responsibility for all legislation in the United States with the House of Representatives. To be valid, both houses must approve an identical document for an act of Congress.

Under the provisions on “advice and consent” (Article II section 2) of the Constitution, the Senate shall have substantial powers: a two-thirds majority of all present Senators and a simple majority for the approval of major public appointments, such as the cabinet members, ambasseries and judges of the Supreme Court shall be required to sign the Treaties. The Senate also adjudicates the impeachment procedures in the House of Representatives, which require a two thirds majority for conviction.

As in the House of Representatives, the method and organisation are dominated by political parties and by the committee system. Each party elects a leader, who is generally an important senator with his own power to coordinate the activity of the Senate. The largest party leader is known as the leader of the majority, while the head of the opposition is known as the leader of the minority. The leaders of the Senate also play an essential role in the appointment of Senate committee members to review legislation and process legislation and wield general control over government agencies and departments. The Vice-President of the United States acts as the Senate President but may only vote if a tie exists. In the absence of the Vice President, the president pro tempore, usually the longest-serving member of the majority party, is the chairman of the Senate.

Seventeen standing committees are largely divided into key policy areas, each with staff, budgets and different sub-committees. The chairman of each committee is a majority party member. The standing committees on appropriations, finance, government operations, international relations and the judiciary are essential. Thousands of proposals are referred to committees during each Congressional meeting, but only a percentage of them are taken up by the committees. The final text for a statute is regarded in mark-up sessions, which may be open or closed.

Debbie Stabeno Contact Address, Phone Number, Whatsapp Number, Email ID, Website 16

The Senate’s smaller membership allows for a broader debate than in the House of Representatives. Three-fifths of the membership (60 senators) had to vote for a cloture to monitor a filibuster – lengthy debate blocking legislative action. (In 2013 the Senate invoking cloture rule was redefined to allow for majority voting for discussion on all presidential nominations except for those of the Supreme Court, and in 2017, the Supreme Court nominations were similarly revised.) If the measure under discussion changes the rules of the Senate, only two-thirds of those present may call for cloture. The structure of party control in the Senate is less intricate; the position adopted by powerful senators may be more relevant than the position of the party (if any).

The constitutional rules concerning the Senate membership qualifications provide for a minimum age of 30, for nine years of US citizenship, and for residence in the state of which you are elected.

In the summer of 1787, the Constitution was written by 55 members of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which was nominally called upon to change the articles of the Confederation (1781–89), the first written constitution in the country.

After protracted and often rancorous discussions on matters such as the rights of States, representation and slavery, the Constitution was a product of political compromise. Delegates from small and large states did not agree whether each state should have the same number of representatives as in the new federal assembly, as was the case with the Articles of Confederation, or differ according to the size of one country. Furthermore, certain delegates from northern states tried to eliminate slavery or, if not, to make representation contingent on the size of a free nation.

Simultaneously, certain delegates in southern Europe threatened to abandon the convention if their demands for the legal maintenance of slavery and slave trade and the counting of slaves were not granted. The framers finally overcame their disputes by adopting a proposal by the Connecticut delegation. The Great Commitment as it became known has formed a bicameral legislature with an equally-represented Senate and a House of Representants to represent a free state population plus three-fifths of its enslaved people.

Another slavery bargain prohibited Congress from prohibiting the import of slaves until 1808. (Article I, Section 9). After all disagreements have been overcome, on 17 September 1787 the revised Constitution was signed by 39 delegates and on 28 September submitted to 13 states for approval.

In 1787–88 Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison published in New York’s newspapers a series of writings on the Constitution and the Republican Government, in an effort to encourage New York to ratify the Constitution. Their work, penned as ‘Publius’ and collected and published as The Federalist (1788), was made a classic exhibition and defence of the Constitution. In June 1788, after nine states (as necessary by Article VII) approved the Constitution, Congress designated March 4, 1789 as the day on which the new government would begin the procedures (the first elections under the Constitution were held late in 1788). Since ratification was subject to a promised addition of a Bill of Rights in several states, in September 1789 Congress presented 12 amendments, 10 were adopted by the States, and their approval was recognised in December 15, 1791. (One of the original twelve proposals for modifications prohibiting the mid-term remuneration of Congressmen was ratified as the Twenty-Seventh Amendment in 1992. The last was never adopted on the citizen ratio per Member of the House of Representatives.)

The Constitution’s authors were heavily affected by the experience of the country under the articles of the Confederation, which sought to maintain the independence and sovereignty of states as much as possible, and to assign only those nationally important functions to the central government which states could not handle individually. But the events of the years 1781-1787 including the incapability of the national government during the rebellion of Shays (1786-1787) in Massachusetts demonstrated that the articles were not workable because they deprived the national government of many essential powers, including direct taxation and the ability to regulate intergovernmental trade. It was thought that this problem would be solved by the new Constitution.


The framework of the Constitution focused in particular on limiting government power and ensuring the freedom of citizens. The doctrine of the separation, checks and balances of legislative, executive, and judicial powers between branches and other sectors and the explicit guarantees of freedom were all designed to strike a balanced balance between authority and freedom — the central objective of the American constitutional law.

The Constitution organises the fundamental political institutions of the country in a clear way. The principal material consists of seven articles. Article I deprives the House of Representatives and the Senate of all legislative authority in Congress. The Great Compromise established that the House would be represented by the general population and that each state has a right to two senators. House Members serve two-year terms, Senators six terms. The powers granted to Congress include the right to levy taxes, borrow money, control trade between the states, pay for armed troops, declare war and establish members’ seats and procedural rules. The House begins and the Senate adjudicates the prosecution processes.

(1)Full Name: Debbie Stabeno

(2)Nickname: Debbie Stabeno

(3)Born: 29 April 1950

(4)Father: Not Available

(5)Mother: Not Available

(6)Sister: Not Available

(7)Brother: Not Available

(8)Marital Status: Married

(9)Profession: Politician

(10)Birth Sign: Taurus

(11)Nationality: American

(12)Religion: Not Available

(13)Height: Not Available

(14)School: Not Available

(15)Highest Qualifications: Not Available

(16)Hobbies: Not Available

(17)Address: Gladwin, Michigan, U.S

(18)Contact Number: (202) 224-4822

(19)Email ID: Not Available

(20)Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stabenow

(21)Twitter: https://twitter.com/SenStabenow


(22)Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/senatordebbiestabenow/

(23)Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/SenatorStabenow

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